How to Find Your Domain Name Before Starting your Internet Business

How to Find Your Domain Name Before Starting your Internet Business

by Diane M. Hoffmann

A lot of people have put the cart before the horse when it comes to deciding on a domain name for their Internet business. I know many business folks who have done this and I've done it myself when I first started out on the World Wide Web.

Internet business is serious business and a domain name is too important an integral part of the web site to ignore the research needed to get it right from the start.

Most people, when they first start thinking about joining the millions on the cyber business highway, get very excited about thinking up the "perfect" name they will call their Internet business, based on the business idea they have in mind.

They go through an array of words and phrases that will be catchy or easy to remember or telling of the type of business they are starting up. After many words combination, they settle on a name and then start working on building a web site.

However, there are a few systematic steps that need to be followed before getting there. First, one has to find the right niche. You may have a good idea and think you have a niche, but is it the right niche?

So that needs to be done first and there is a process to get there. Briefly, you do a search of the idea you have in mind and see if there are enough searchers and potential to wade through the competition.

This article is specific to finding your domain name and assumes that you've already found your right niche. Because, here's the trick, these two really go together. At least if you want to maximize the impact of your keywords on the search engines.

Once you have your right niche, then you create your domain name based on that. So, let's say that after you did your search you found that your niche is "computer software".

You also found, through your research, other related words that have high profitability with the words computer software in it, like computer software programs, computer software shops, kids computer software, cheap computer software, etc..

That would be a good bet for your domain name. Now you might find that when you do a search at the registry for the domain name "computer software", it's already taken. Well there are a variety of combination of words that you can incorporate in that name. It might be computer-software-abc or computer-software-123 or you could use your initials, computer-software-about, etc.

The idea is that your web site will be built on your keywords right from the beginning of the name of your site and then the name of your pages. You will have computer-software-about dot something slash computer-software-products or slash computer-software-systems or slash computer-software-tools, etc. for each page that you will build.

You get the idea. It needs some research up front in order to make the biggest impact possible from your keywords. Search engines love logic and look for the web site that has the most of the information the searcher is looking for.

So your keywords should be in the domain name, in the page name and repeated within the text content of the page in various forms and combination, as well as in a sprinkling of the exact keywords throughout.

Every bit that can be added to make your Internet business more effective and successful is worth all the effort and time it takes to get it there. And finding your domain name before starting your Internet business is a big part of your overall Internet business success planning. /dmh


Diane M. Hoffmann is founder and owner of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of this blog site and http://www.build-your-internet-business-now.com and author of several books, e-books and articles, including "Contextual Communication, Organization and Training". Diane has recently shifted her primary focus to helping entrepreneurs start and grow their own Internet business. Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include this bio.




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How to Market Your Web Site to Search Engines

How to Market Your Web Site to Search Engines
by Diane M. Hoffmann

Let's face it, search engines are the most important element of Internet and web site marketers. They are the indispensable tool to reach potential customers. So, knowing how they work and what they like should be the most important activity to how to market your web site to search engines.

I'm not an expert on search engine operation, but from what I've been reading, continuously, on the subject, there are ways to get the most effective results from them. The rules of the game change periodically if you try to trick them, but if you use the fundamentals of search engine efficiency, it will stay pretty stable.

The critical factor of search engines, of course, is the use of the keywords and phrases -- and the integration of these related keywords and phrases into your web site, pages and content. The more keyword-rich your site is, the more the search engines will spot you.

And there is also another factor that's become more and more critical of late and that is the links into your site from outside web sites. In other words search engines will pick up on the amount of links that come into your site as a high sign of credibility. The more links the more the site is deemed important by outsiders.

Marketing is the most important activity of a business - online or offline. It is the lifeblood of the business. Stop marketing and your business stops growing. So you need to use every available way to market your web site to the Internet. Here are some of the most important ways to include in your marketing:

1. Captivate names (most important because the money is in the list). You do this by offering free reports, subscriptions, e-courses, weekly tips or monthly newsletters, etc.

2. Do a search on the web for e-zines that are related or complementary to your product or service and write articles to e-zine editors.

3. Go on Google and read the instructions on how to do Pay-Per-Click advertising.

4. Do videos and up-load them to U-Tube (using keywords in your title).

5. Add Google AdSense to your pages. Again go to Google and read about this.

6. Get on forums that are related or complementary and participate in the discussions, give advice or information in your niche area, etc.

7. Become an affiliate to merchants that offer complementary products where you get a commission on sales when people buy from your site.

8. Write your own e-books and courses, seminars, webinars, tele-seminars, etc.(this is where the real money is).

9. Get some links from outside web sites into yours. Look for related or complementary sites and write to the webmaster asking for a link exchange.

10. Partner with other businesses and get companies to sponsor you. Create ways and venues to do this where there is a win-win situation for both.

11. Start a Blog.

12. Get on Twitter and Facebook, etc. and learn how to use them to your advantage.

Always make sure that whatever you build is keyword-rich in titles and content.

Include short surveys and questionnaires into your emails and newsletters and ask your customers/subscribers what they like and don't like (no more than 3 questions at a time -- people don't have time to fill in lengthy forms).

Keep looking for new avenues and offerings that will create buzz and continuity of exposure to the pockets of potential customers. For this, it is essential to know your potential market well. Who are they? Where are they? What do they want?

Keep doing that and depending on how in demand your product or service is, your web site will grow according to the effort you put into it. And never stop learning./dmh

Diane M. Hoffmann is founder and owner of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of this blog site and http://www.build-your-internet-business-now.com and author of several books, e-books and articles, including "Contextual Communication, Organization and Training". Diane has recently shifted her primary focus to helping entrepreneurs start and grow their own Internet business. Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include this bio.



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Home Office Planning

Three Things to Consider First When Planning Your Home Office.
by Diane M. Hoffmann, ISRP

As a certified International Staging and Re-design Professional click here for info I'd like to help you with this article I put together to ease the task of planning or re-doing your home office.

So you decided to set up an office at home. Or you've had a home office for some time but you realize that a makeover is due now.

Where do you begin?

Well, first, consider what part of the house you will set up your office in. Personally, and many other practical self-employed entrepreneur, I use the living room for an office.

The reason is because it is the first room you come into from the entrance. This makes it more business and professional for your visitors (and your friends and family who often don't take you seriously if you work from home).

It is also good for you as you come and go in your business activities to enter into your office as you open the front door. It gives you the feeling of real office and lets you take care of the business matters right away as you make your way to your domestic area of the house.

And using the living room also eliminates going through the personal belongings of a house, or the children's toys and activities, etc., in order to get to the office area.

If you cannot use the living room for whatever reason, or if you don't need to use it because you will not have business visitors, then you can look for the most practical place that you have for your purpose.

Wherever you chose to set up your home office, there are three things you need to consider first when planning a home office area:

1. Functionality.
2. Efficiency.
3. Convenience.

As you look at what area you should use, put these three items in you thought.

Some questions to ask yourself:

What tasks will I be performing.
Will I be drawing, computing, drafting, building, sewing, telephoning, etc.

What will help me accomplish the tasks I'll be doing?
Will I need a drafting table, a computer, work tables, printers, etc.

When will I be working?
During the day, at night, both (I often get up at 3 o'clock in the middle of the night and come down to my office and work till 7 or 8 am, then have breakfast and go back to work. For this, I need to have good lighting over my computer and desk area. So you need overall lighting as well as lighting over the work area.

For during the day, make best use of your natural light by placing your most important work area near the window. But consider your equipment so that you don't end up for example with the light glaring on to your computer screen.

Are there enough electrical outlets for all the operating equipment?
Consider the placement of your equipment to make the electrical connection as easy as possible.

For example, I always make sure to place my desk in such a way so that I can get to the back of my computer. I have found over the years this to be an issue whenever I've had to upgrade or fix computer equipment. You need to be able to get to the back panels or electrical power cords which usually accommodate other lighting and telephony equipment, printers etc.

And make sure you don't over power any electrical outlet. Spread it around and make sure it's not all on the same circuit breaker. Your home office area may require additional outlets which is a safer bet than to many extension cords.

Who else must be accommodated in the room?
Will there be someone else working with me? Will I be seeing salespeople, customers, prospects? Will I have a bookkeeper coming in part-time? Think of all these things because you will have to set-up an area either within the room or just outside close by.

Does the space suit your habits or personality?
Do you privacy or do you prefer to be accessible to your family? Are you more at easy with a casual environment or do you feel better in a more formal surrounding.

Once you've outlined your preferred requirements, make your home office a pleasant workplace.

Chose a decorating style from country and traditional to contemporary. Your choice of furniture and accessories will highlight these styles.

You can have a mix of casual and formal by placing one major furniture as a focus point that carries the primary style. For example, a large antique breakfront for your books, with a contemporary desk and a traditional looking chair, would make a statement of personal formality and professionalism.

Select furnishings and details you enjoy. Include some history. Set out some family photos, award items, travel souvenirs that will show up your personality.

Mix texture to soften the look. Use fabric-covered panels behind a laminate desk to absorb outside noises. Leave windows clear of curtains and drapes in order to let as much light as possible in.

Use clean, bright and light paint and colors to give maximum lighting and space. Bring your preferred accent colors in your furniture and accessories.

Allow room for expansion. You may have to add storage, working space etc. Make sure the place you pick has some area within or adjacent for this.

And last but not least, consider your personal influence within that home office environment. Your personal presentation. Dress for success.

I always cringe when I hear those who try to entice you to get into Internet business because you can "work in your pyjamas". Right, give me a break. Business is serious business. You could lose your shirt if you're not in the proper frame of mind at any time. Success requires self-discipline.

Even if you are at home, dress for business. You never know when someone might call on you to do business. Always be ready. It is a fact that when we are appropriately dressed we feel better, talk better and work better. It affects the whole psyche and it is a good habit for yourself and a good example for others who follow. /dmh


Diane M. Hoffmann is founder and director of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of this blog site and http://www.build-your-internet-business-now.com and author of several books, e-books and articles, including "Contextual Communication, Organization and Training". Diane has recently shifted her primary focus to helping entrepreneurs start and grow their own Internet business. Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include this bio.



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How to Start an Internet Business - For Early Beginners.

by Diane M. Hoffmann, ph.d./th.
Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications


How to Start an Internet Business - For Early Beginners.

A lot of people would like to start an internet business but don't know how. In times like these, many folks are looking to alternatives to employment. They are looking to make money in their own business. For many, the Internet seems attractive. But is it easy?

Well, nothing is easy - especially running a business, whether it is ONline or OFFline. Actually, I might even say that, from my own experience being in business for many years, Internet business may be even harder.

To start an Internet business cost less than a physical offline business. But it takes a lot of special skills that you don't have to have with a brick and mortar business. Like writing for instance. A lot of your Internet business will depend on good writing.

If you don't know how to write well, you will have a hard time convincing your visitors. Because on the Internet, you don't talk to your prospects as you would in a store-front location, you give written information to someone you don’t even see.

But, that is not to discourage you from starting your own Internet business. You can learn to write. First you have to decide whether or not you are a good writer. Do you like writing? That's the beginning. If you don't like writing at all, you will not be very happy in the Internet business -- at least I don't think so. Mind you, you can hire people who will write for you. But that's for another article.

The major difference between ONline and OFFline business is that one depends on location and the other on information. With either business, you can start out of your home, which makes it economical. But with the brick and mortar business, you are limited as to the exposure to your prospect traffic.

The online Internet business has another type of traffic that you must go out and get. If you have an offline business in a store-front location your traffic finds you as they walk by, either by chance or by having looked you up on a telephone book or business directory.

On the other hand to start an Internet business, you not only need to write to your prospects, you need to first find them, then attract them to your site, than give them the information they want, and then sell them the product they want after you have earned their trust by the information written on your web site. All of this done without a face-to-face contact.

To start an Internet business requires the knowledge of what it entails before getting a web site and host provider, and a domain name. Once you know that you are prepared to write (or to hire someone to write for you), you need to figure out what type of business you will focus on. That may sound easy. You might already have an idea of what you'd like to do business in.

But, what about the millions of prospects out on cyber space? Is your type of business what they are looking for? Out of the multi-million searchers and surfers, how many want your information and product? And who are they? How do you get your site known to them?

That's when you need to do the first thing in your adventure to start an Internet business. You need to find your niche (pronounced nish, not nitch). Is the business you have in mind a good niche? It may be for you, but is it for your customers? If nobody wants it, you won't have any customers to buy.

See how many results come back on a term that people would type in on a search engine to find your type of business information. If it is in the millions, you have a long journey ahead to make it on the Net. If the results are in the thousands, you have a better chance, if in the hundreds - even better yet. Get the idea?

Now, the search begins. Go to 'Google's Keywords Tool' and enter your search term in there. For example, 'landscaping', if that's what you would want to start your business in. You will see the return of your keyword plus others associated with it.

Look at the terms that interest you and type each one in a Google search to see what returns you get (it will be under the search term text box. That's where you see if they are in the millions, thousands or hundreds. You can also see the list of your competitors on that page and even click on some of them to see what their site looks like.

Put your findings on a spreadsheet columns of comparative possible niches and see which ones have the least competitive results. Keep doing that until you find something that shows potential and that interests you the most.

There is still more to this, but it is definitely the starting point. What you have to do first before you start an Internet business is find out which niche will work for you./dmh

Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include the following bio. 
Diane M. Hoffmann is president of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of http://buildinternetbusiness.blogspot.com/ and author of several books, e-books and articles on starting and growing an Internet business.








For the information page on my e-book, "How to Start, Build and Grow Your Own Internet Business Now", please click here
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Two Solutions to Weird Text and Bizarre Links in Web Site Building

Two Solutions to Weird Text and Bizarre Links in Web Site Building

by Diane M. Hoffmann, ph.d.
Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications

As Featured On EzineArticles

As the creator of several web sites, I can say that I learned (and still do) a lot through my trial-and-error experiences. However, a tech-savvy I am not. I often have to rely on others who are technological experts.

But I like to share what I do come across in my web site building treks that can help others. It might save many of you some frustrations. There are two problems I recently experienced that I want to share today.

The first one is the importing of articles I wrote in Notepad into my web site. It took me ages to clean up the line spacing and extra carriers mid-sentences. I talked to many folks about it and nobody could tell me what the problem was. I asked on a popular Forum I use and there too, no one knew. Many told me about other writing pads that I should use and gave some links to them etc... Well I tried them but the learning curve was so great that I just threw my hands up in the air in frustration. That was quite a while ago.

The good news is that just recently, by accident I found the solution. And it is very simple - isn't that the way it usually is! For some reason, I thought of clicking off the "word wrap" in the "format" menu feature of NotePad. Then when I highlighted my article, pasted it in my web site -- presto, the whole thing was perfect with all it's proper paragraphs. I did not have to go through it line after line deleting spacing and false paragraphs any more!

The other tip I want to share with you all is a very important one.

I recently had a problem with a link to a product I just set-up on ClickBank. I followed everything CB instructed me to do, set my link up on my web site, but it didn't work. I checked and re-checked until I was sure I had done everything right. Then I wrote to CB and told them the problem. I got an e-mail back that everything was correctly entered on my link but that there was a coding problem and I had to find an expert to fix it.

Well, off I went again to the Forum, but no takers. I tried a variety of other possibilities but no luck there either. Then I remembered a book I had purchased a while ago to do with computer IT security and I got in touch with the author. From what I had seen in his book, I figured if anyone would know about this, it would be him.

To make a long story short, after a bit of email exchange, I did receive the solution. And here's the tip for you from all this. If you have some weird problems with links that you've copied from someone else, like an affiliate tool box for example, and correctly pasted it into your web site but it doesn't work and you can't see where the problem is... just paste the link into your notepad first, re-type any characters that are not ordinary letters (such as quotation marks for example), type your own IDs that need to be changed, and then highlight and paste it into your web site. Then you'll have a clean link.

Actually, if you want to be even more technical about this, you can check your page "view selection source" in your web site on that link and you will see the "unseen" codes that were added to your link. Now, don't ask me anything beyond that because I don't know. If you're an expert, you'll probably find this to be child play, but if you are someone who is struggling with these issues on your way up to success in web site building, you'll appreciate my herein contribution. To your success! /dmh


Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include the following bio.

Diane M. Hoffmann is president of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of http://buildinternetbusiness.blogspot.com/ and author of several books, e-books and articles on starting and growing an Internet business.







For the information page on my e-book, "How to Start, Build and Grow Your Own Internet Business Now", please click here for info page




Send me your comments !
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New Terms for Internet Business Start-up...

New Terms for Internet Business Start-up:
"Niche Nesting", "Wanted Needs" and "Sustained Motivation"


by Diane M. Hoffmann, ph.d.
Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications

As Featured On EzineArticles

OK, I got three new terms downloaded into my brain a few days ago as I was in deep thoughts about what to look for in a successful internet business start-up...

We've all heard about finding a niche in order to start a successful Internet business. A niche is a specific narrow, focused market to deliver your service or product to, where the target market group is smaller but demand is high.

We've also heard the old saying "find a need and fill it". Well that doesn't work so much any more because, a) the offerings to cover the needs have grown too big, b) we'd rather play than work or study, c) we may need it but we'll buy the want first.

The first new term I got the other day is "Niche Nesting". It's great to find a niche, but we need to nest into it. We need to get ourselves burrowed comfortably in it for the long run, placing that chosen niche into the way of the tortoise, and making it our very personal own to cultivate and grow.

The other term is "Wanted Needs". Now with the economy being tougher than it used to be, we've matured and have become more careful with our money. We're more conscious of our competitive market and suddenly realize that in order to survive we need to smarten up.

Suddenly it dawned on us that we need to embark on a "Personal Continuous Improvement Program" (PCIP), because, if we don't, we're going to be left behind coughing up in the dust of smart business proteges and their coaches.

Wanted Needs are the needs that we used to scoff at in the whirlwinds of affluent years passed. Now we cherish our hard earned money more and keep it tighter to our vest. We're careful where we spend it and are looking for smarter ways to invest it on ourselves and our skills. Now, we realize that we must be in a constant mode of growing and learning and those needs have shifted to become something we now want.

Another important factor to business start-up I found is that motivation alone is not enough anymore either. We get many ideas as we learn more, read more, and follow our models and coaches and so-called old-salt gurus of the Internet.

You know what I mean... that exuberant feeling when you think of a new workable idea or business at 3 am in the morning. Then by the time you get up, or by the next day, the bubbles have receded to let doubt and fear rise to the top instead -- or else some other idea has now taken over the mind processing cycle.

Motivation alone is no longer enough. For any one of those new ideas to make it to fruition requires "sustained motivation".

"Niche Nesting", "Wanted Needs" and "Sustained Motivation", three new terms to work on in the days to come for business start-up and growth.\dmh

Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include the following bio. 

Diane M. Hoffmann is president of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of http://buildinternetbusiness.blogspot.com/ and author of several books, e-books and articles on starting and growing an Internet business.








For the information page on my e-book, "How to Start, Build and Grow Your Own Internet Business Now", please click here for info page



Send me your comments!
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Beware of Promises When Buying Products on the Internet.

Beware of Promises When Buying Products on the Internet.

by Diane M. Hoffmann, ph.d.
Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications

As Featured On EzineArticles

Buying on the Internet is always a harrowing experience. At least for those who are fairly new at it. First you're not sure if you should give that information and credit card number or not. You click on the link and read and just when you're about to fill in the form you click out...

Depending on how much you want that product that's being offered, the experience intensifies as you go back and forth wondering if you'll be giving personal information to an unknown recipient, or if you'll have problems of any sorts, or if the whole process will work at all.

What about the promises? The offer says it's guaranteed! "If you're not entirely satisfied, we will refund your money in full". With that in mind, you go ahead and dare. When you get your products, you breathe a sigh of relief.

But, what about if you get the product and find it's not working like it said it would, or like you expected? If it's a couple of bucks, it's bad enough if you can't get your money back. But what if it's a couple of hundreds? Or even thousands? Now, that's pretty serious.

I don't want to scare anyone, but I've had some pretty close calls. To the point of making a decision that I will be very careful before buying again on the Internet anything that is high ticketed. But I do want to be clear that I've purchased dozens of products on the Internet over the years without any problem at all.

However, recently I have had two not so good experiences with high profile Internet Marketing businesses.

Now, I am not in the habit of buying a product and asking for my money back. Over my 10+ years on the Internet, I have returned a product only three times. One was several years ago, where I got my money back immediately after sending out the request. It was only for $47.

Recently, I had to request a refund twice. One was for a $200 service product that did not work out at all for me because it was way too big for my small operation.

The other was a much higher ticket program that contained information more specific to a start-up situation, which I already had. I wanted new tools and strategies that would take my business from where it is to a higher level, but this was for levels below and start-up.

The latter responded positively and responsibly after about three e-mail correspondence. And they were very understanding and courteous about it.

The former is a different story. I have been corresponding weekly since December 7 with over half of my emails not even answered.

I have taken my emails to a higher level of management and did not get an answer from there either as of this date. I will keep you informed.

These two scenarios have brought me to the decision that I will be even more hesitant from now on to purchase high ticket items.

So, don't stop buying on the Internet, but be very careful and aware that high ticket items are more risky. Read the sales letter cautiously and the guarantee very closely, because it could very well be that the product does not deliver what you expected, even though it may be a good product./dmh

Copyright(c)2009 Diane M. Hoffmann. You may reprint this article without any changes, making sure to include the following bio. 


Diane M. Hoffmann is president of Hoffmann-Rondeau Communications, which offers ONline and OFFline business services and resources. She is the founder and creator of http://buildinternetbusiness.blogspot.com/ and author of several books, e-books and articles on starting and growing an Internet business.

Want to find out step-by-step "How To Get Your Promised Refund From Internet Businesses That Would Like You to Give Up and Go Away!"?
Check my e-book right here.

Leave a comment below !
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